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February 22, 2019: Friday News Roundup

We’re giving robot news a break this week and focusing on the human brain instead. Put on some soft music, get comfy, and sleep your way to learning
(sort of…)!

This Is the Fastest-Growing Six-Figure Job in America — and it Doesn’t Require a Degree
There’s a reason people flock to Udemy to learn how to make mobile apps: it’s lucrative, in-demand skill. But, as this article points out, signing up for an app development course today is just the beginning of a lifelong-learning process, since “app developers need to be well-versed on the latest coding languages to make sure they’re still a viable candidate for their current or prospective job.”

Managing The Stress of Freelancing: Six Ways To Take Control
This writer shares his experience as a freelancer and the pressure to always be hustling for the next gig and proving your worth to the next client. This lifestyle isn’t for everyone; it requires being adept at managing the anxiety of an unpredictable workload and revenue stream. But if you’re up to the challenge, here’s some advice for keeping the stress in check.

How Music Motivates The Brain To Learn
If you’re someone who’s at their most productive with headphones on pumping out the tunes, you’re not alone. Science shows that listening to music really does “pragmatically benefit us in numerous ways…,” and “pleasurable music motivates the brain to learn and to strive for its reward.”

3 Simple Habits That Can Protect Your Brain From Cognitive Decline
According to this article, strategies for keeping your brain fit may overlap with things you might do to keep your body healthy too. For example, one study found that endurance exercise “was most effective in increasing neurogenesis,” i.e., the birth of new neurons. Continuing to experience new things as we age is another key to encouraging neurogenesis.

New Study Suggests You Can Learn While You Sleep
No question, this is our favorite research finding of the week (year?). We didn’t think we could love sleep even more, but now a study has shown we can even learn while we’re getting some shut-eye! As one German researcher put it, “the sleeping brain can actually encode new information and store it for long term.”